How To Do The IOSH Managing Safely Project

13 minute read | Sep 06 2018


If you are taking the IOSH Managing Safely course and you need to find out more about the assessment, this post will let you know how to complete the second part of the assessment – the project. So don’t worry once you have read this you will be in a perfect place to know how to successfully complete your risk assessment project in your workplace.

This project needs to be completed in order to gain certification and is an essential skill learnt – how to carry out a risk assessment so you can work safely. By the time you start your IOSH Managing Safely project assignment you will have already done the first part of the assessment -the 45-minute written paper consisting of 20 multi-format questions on basic health and safety at the end of your online or class course.

Before you start the IOSH Managing Safely project

Ensure that you are aware of the deadline date that the project has to be submitted (2 weeks after the date of your written test). Don’t leave it until the last minute! Ensure you read ALL of the guidance given to you by your course provider.

Each Stage of the IOSH Managing Safely Project

The project in simple terms is the production of a risk assessment covering a task within your own work environment. In order to complete the Risk Assessment, you are to identify 4 HAZARDS that are NOT adequately controlled.

I will now talk you through each stage of the Risk Assessment:

Make sure you fill in ALL of the boxes available on the Risk Assessment Form because they earn you marks and let’s face it every mark counts!

Details – (1 mark)Completing your IOSH Managing Safely Project

Name – Your Name
Course End Date – When you finished your course
Training Provider – Who delivered your training
Assessors Name – Your Name
Date and Time – When the assessment was undertaken
Work area – where the task is being undertaken
Task being assessed – what TASK are you Risk Assessing, for example, cleaning up spilled oil or carrying boxes from a conveyor belt to a pallet or cutting pieces of wood with a circular saw.

Clearly Identify the Hazard (1 Mark)

Clearly identify what the hazard is. Remember that a hazard is anything that has the potential to cause harm. Ensure that you clearly describe the hazard. This does not necessarily mean you have to write a lot but that what you do put down is clear to all what the hazard is. For example, a slip hazard is rather vague; a slip hazard due to spillages of oil/petrol provides a bit more clarity for the marker and in real-life for those workers who read the risk assessment.

Who Might be Harmed? (1 Mark)

You will automatically think of the worker(s) undertaking the task and the workers within the working area but remember that others might also be at risk. Think outside the box – do you have visitors in the work area? Cleaners? Maintenance workers? The public? If so, they should be noted down here.

How Might People be Harmed? (1 Mark)

Remember this includes injury AND ill health. We often think of the immediate effects of hazards in terms of injuries but do also consider whether there are any longer term ill health effects associated with the hazard. Clearly state what any injury or ill health effects are in this section.

Existing Risk Control Measures (1 Mark)

This is asking you to identify what measures of control you have in place for this hazard at the time of your assessment. In this part, don’t limit your answer to physical controls such as guards, local exhaust ventilation (LEV), signage etc. Also consider administrative/soft controls such as training, supervision, job rotation, safe systems of work etc. (These are also important to consider when you get to the Additional Controls stage below).

Also, be clear with your description of the controls; don’t just write one word controls such as PPE. Clearly define what type of PPE is required. For example, nitrile gloves or safety goggles.

Current Risk Rating (1 Mark)

This is where you risk rate the hazard with the controls you currently have in place.

  • The L stands for Likelihood – how likely is it that someone will be harmed?
  • The C stands for Consequence – what are the consequences if someone is harmed? This is also often referred to as the Severity of harm.
  • In order to do this, use the IOSH 5 x 5 Risk Rating Calculator. This risk rates the likelihood and consequences on a scale of 1-5 as shown below:

Risk Rating Calculator

Likelihood that hazardous event will occur
 1   very unlikely
 2  unlikely
 3  fairly likely
 4  likely
 5  very likely
  
 Consequence  of  hazardous  event            
1  Insignificant– no injury
  2   Minor –  minor injuries needing first aid 
  3   Moderate –  up to three days’ absence
      4       Major –  more than seven days’ absence
  5   Catastrophic –  death

You then multiply the likelihood by the consequence to get your Risk Rating (R).

Remember: Likelihood x Consequence = Risk

For example, if you think the likelihood is ‘Likely’ (4) and the Consequence is ‘Moderate’ (3).
4 x 3 = 12. Your Risk Rating is 12.

Many students worry here that they have to get the right number. The marker is fully aware that this type of rating system is subjective and there will always be a variety of opinions with the risk rating. Just ensure that you are realistic with your ratings and you will be all right.

Additional Controls (1 Mark)

This requires you to provide additional controls that will reduce the risk.
As discussed in the section ‘Existing Risk Control Measures’ above ensure you think about various types of controls not just physical ones.

Residual Risk Rating (1 Mark)

This is where you risk rate the hazard with the additional controls you have added.
Follow the same procedure as previously:
Use the IOSH 5 x 5 Risk Rating Calculator.
The L stands for Likelihood – how likely is it that someone will be harmed?
The C stands for Consequence – what are the consequences if someone is harmed? This is also often referred to as the Severity of harm.

You then multiply the likelihood by the consequence to get your Residual Risk Rating (R).
*Your Residual Risk Rating should be lower than your previous Risk Rating*

Action Monitored by Whom? (1 Mark)

You then multiply the likelihood by the consequence to get your Risk Rating (R).
For example, if you think the likelihood is ‘Likely’ (4) and the Consequence is ‘Moderate’ (3).
4 x 3 = 12. Your Risk Rating is 12.

Many students worry here that they have to get the right number. The marker is fully aware that this type of rating system is subjective and there will always be a variety of opinions with the risk rating. Just ensure that you are realistic with your ratings and you will be all right.

Additional Controls (1 Mark)

This requires you to provide additional controls that will reduce the risk.
As discussed in the section ‘Existing Risk Control Measures’ above ensure you think about various types of controls not just physical ones.

Residual Risk Rating (1 Mark)

This is where you risk rate the hazard with the additional controls you have added.
Follow the same procedure as previously:

  • Use the IOSH 5 x 5 Risk Rating Calculator.
  • The L stands for Likelihood – how likely is it that someone will be harmed?
  • The C stands for Consequence – what are the consequences if someone is harmed? This is also often referred to as the Severity of harm.
  • You then multiply the likelihood by the consequence to get your Residual Risk Rating (R).
    *Your Residual Risk Rating should be lower than your previous Risk Rating*

Action Monitored by Whom? (1 Mark)

Clearly state using a job role (e.g. Engineering Manager) who is to monitor each additional control.

Action Monitored by When? (1 Mark)

Allocate a time scale for each additional control. For example, 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 2 months. Do not put phrases such as ‘On-going’ or ‘Within a few weeks’. Make sure you follow the IOSH Action Level Table that provides you with guidance based on your Risk Rating:

Risk Rating Action
20-25 Stop – stop activity and take immediate action
15-16 Urgent action – take immediate action and stop activity if necessary, maintain existing controls rigorously
8-12 Action – improve within specified timescale
3-6 Monitor – look to improve at next review or if there is a significant change
1-2 No action – no further action but ensure controls are maintained and reviewed

Review Date, Signature and Training Provider (1 Mark)

Don’t forget to fill in the bottom of the form outlined below – it will get you a mark!

  • Ensure that you give a realistic review date for your assessment, for example, 12 months.
  • Sign the Assessment – if sending via computer your printed name.
  • Put your Training Provider name in the last box.

Marking

During each stage of the Assessment highlighted above, you will gain a mark. For each hazard identified, you can gain 9 marks (1 for each column). You have to identify FOUR Hazards, therefore 4 x 9 = 36 marks. You will also gain a mark each for completing the top (1 mark) and bottom (1 mark) sections of the forms. This will give you a total of 38 possible marks. You require 23/38 marks to pass. REMEMBER fill in every box. A tabulated marking scheme can be seen below:

Marking Scheme

Marking Scheme-1

Submitting your Project

If sending in your project via mail to your course provider, ensure that you do so with plenty of time to spare and ensure you send via recorded delivery – this will give you peace of mind that it has arrived at the providers.

If sending via e-mail, ensure that you get email confirmation that the project has been received by asking them to confirm receipt of your project via email.

Ready to Get Started on your Project

I hope this is a useful guide on how to complete your IOSH Managing Safely Risk Assessment project. If you follow this advice you will be in  a strong position to  get your project done.

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